Recipe: Overnight Chia Seed Pudding

overnight chia pudding

We can all add a little more fiber to our diets. This fast, easy-to- make chia seed pudding recipe is tasty and provides a much-needed fiber kick. It’s also customizable so the possibilities are endless! Enjoy as a breakfast item or dessert or both!

Overnight Chia Seed Pudding

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 cup milk of choice (favorites include coconut or hemp)
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 1-2 tbsp agave syrup or maple syrup (optional)

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in an airtight container and leave overnight in the refrigerator. You can use mason jars or any other containers that has a lid. Make sure all the ingredients are well combined and there aren’t any clumps.

  2. Leave overnight and enjoy! 

Recipe Notes

Leftovers may be kept in the fridge up to 3 days. Before serving additional toppings, like dried coconut flakes, granola, banana, and blueberries, may be added. The beauty of this recipe is many toppings can be added to it. Enjoy as a breakfast item or dessert or both!

Angie WuAngie Wu is currently completing her master’s degree in Nutrition, Healthspan and Longevity at USC Davis School of Gerontology. She is also currently volunteering for L-Nutra, a nutraceutical company, by screening and qualifying cancer patients for an ongoing clinical trial that aims to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy. In her spare time she enjoys cooking at home, hiking, bar method, yoga and biking along the beach.

Featured Member: Coral Dabarera

Coral Dabarera

We are excited to spotlight Coral Dabarera as this month’s featured student member! Coral is pursuing her master’s degree in Nutrition, Healthspan, and Longevity at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. She is particularly interested in the gut microbiome and mental health and women’s health.  She is currently completing her clinical specialty rotation at a California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program affiliate (called Sweet Success) in Los Angeles. She enjoys yoga, hiking, travel, and trying new cuisines in her free time.

Who or what inspired you to become interested in integrative and functional nutrition?​

On some level, my interest for this field started in 10th grade when I wrote a report about naturopathic doctors. After being accused of studying witch doctors by my classmates, I put the idea of complementary and alternative medicine out of my mind for years until I saw an integrative and functional nutrition dietitian speak at the Rubin Museum in New York. Her talk led me to the field of dietetics, and I have pursued my interest in functional medicine (FM) ever since. Treating the body as a whole makes a lot of sense to me, and I find nutrition’s role in creating mind-body balance fascinating and important.

Treating the body as a whole makes a lot of sense to me, and I find nutrition’s role in creating mind-body balance fascinating and important. Click To Tweet

What area of practice do you plan to go into and how do you plan to secure a job that utilizes integrative and functional nutrition?

I am planning on focusing on women’s health and utilizing what is known about the gut-brain connection in practice. I am interested in how nutrition affects one’s mood and psychological health. I also plan to use nutrigenomics in practice, as I have become fascinated about the future of personalized nutrition through a few classes in my Master’s in Nutrition, Healthspan, and Longevity program at the University of Southern California.

Through my internship rotation with a dietitian in private practice in LA, I have learned a lot about how a functional nutrition-focused dietitian coaches her clients to health and maintains a successful practice. I hope in the future that more organizations will employ dietitians that specialize in integrative and functional nutrition. For now, I plan to have my own practice.

Coral Dabarera Hiking

What education or training in integrative and functional nutrition have you completed or what education or training in integrative and functional nutrition do you plan to complete in the future?

My long-term goal is to earn the IFNCP credential through the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy and to complete the ADAPT Framework Level 1 through the Kresser Institute. I am also interested in taking some Institute of Functional Medicine modules based on my interests down the line.

What advice would you give other students interested in learning more about integrative and functional nutrition?

Join the DIFM DPG, and make sure to join the listserv. Also, listen to webinars from DIFM when you can.  It’s also worth following like-minded dietitians on Instagram and researching the topics that are often discussed.

The future is bright for you, Coral! Thanks for sharing about your experiences and goals with us! 


New to integrative and functional medicine? Check out our Functional Nutrition Toolkit to get acquainted with the resources available in this area of study and practice.

Featured Member: Cynthia Johnson, DrPH, MS, LDN, CHES

Cynthia Johnson

We are pleased to present this month’s Featured Member Cynthia Johnson to you! Cynthia was the winner of our 2017-2018 DIFM Diversity Award.  Cynthia is a nutritionist, public health professional, and educator with over 25 years of experience counseling and educating individuals and the community. She also has experience planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs and performing clinical lab work and research.

What is your area of practice and how do you incorporate integrative and functional nutrition into your work?

I am a licensed dietitian/nutritionist and plan to take the RD exam soon. I work as a nutritionist for WIC; however, as a small business owner, I operate Be Healthy by Nature Wellness, an outpatient wellness center. Many of my clients are overweight/obese, diabetic or prediabetic, have some form of cardiovascular disease or food sensitivities. However, some just want to learn how to eat healthier. I always start with a nutrition assessment, diagnosis and intervention. However, because I have a MS degree in Herbal Medicine, I am able to answer questions and make recommendations to my clients about herbs and supplements that are more evidence-based. I am also a LEAP practitioner and incorporate MRT or mediator release testing to help identify underlying causes of issues such as migraines or irritable bowel syndrome. In addition, I offer genetic testing to gain insight into weight management.

What are some of the results you have seen since integrating functional nutrition into your practice area?

I have helped many lose weight, control blood sugar, relieve migraines, reduce food intolerance symptoms, detoxify and incorporate a healthier lifestyle.

How does your culture influence your practice of integrative and functional nutrition?

Many of my clients are African American like me, so I can identify with the food preferences that are prevalent in this culture and recommend healthier alternatives that are very similar to what they already enjoy. Because I practice in my community, it is not unusual to meet a client that perhaps grew up in my neighborhood or meet clients whose children have attended the same school as mine or maybe even meet fellow parishioners.

Many of my clients are African American like me, so I can identify with the food preferences that are prevalent in this culture and recommend healthier alternatives that are very similar to what they already enjoy. Click To Tweet

Where have you completed most of your training in integrative and functional nutrition?

Much of my training was gained at Maryland University of Integrative Health (MUIH), formerly Tai Sophia Institute, where I received a MS degree in Herbal Medicine. However, prior to that, I studied to become a Traditional Naturopathic Doctor. I have taken many online and weekend courses related to integrative and functional nutrition, and I attended the “Food as Medicine” conference. My doctorate is in Public Health from Morgan State University. The doctorate had an emphasis in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), and I was a National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) fellow. In addition, I am a certified LEAP practitioner. I have also taken the “culinary essentials” course offered by Susan Allen-Everson of Next Level Functional Nutrition (NLFN), and I am currently completing the requirements to receive the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Certificate of Training through the Academy’s Center for Lifelong Learning and the advanced culinary nutrition course through NLFN.

What advice would you give anyone interested in learning more about integrative and functional nutrition?

Look for courses and trainings from reputable sources and learn as much as you can, but realize you can’t learn everything. Use the skills you already have to help as any people as you can.

Wow, we are so grateful that you’ve shared your story with us, Cynthia! 


Interested in the DIFM awards and stipends that we offer? Learn more here.

 

Recipe: Anti-Inflammatory Salad

Kale Salad

 

Full of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients, this salad is as nutrient-dense as it is delicious. The brightness of the vinaigrette sings through the crunch of the cruciferous vegetables, while the pomegranate arils and berries add a touch of sweetness that will bring you back for seconds.

Anti-Inflammatory Salad

Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 2 entrees or 4 sides

Ingredients

For the Salad

  • 1 bunch red, purple, or green kale, washed and destemmed
  • 1 cup cherries, pitted and halved OR ½ cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup blueberries
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate arils
  • 1 head broccoli, cut into very small florets
  • 1/2 cauliflower, riced (can use whole head if desired)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds (pepitas), toasted
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced

For the Dressing

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 2 tbsp flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

Instructions

  1. Slice or tear the kale and toss into a large bowl. With clean hands, gently massage the kale to break down the tough leaves and release their water. After a few minutes the leaves will soften and turn a darker shade of green. Once all of the leaves are wilted, set aside.

  2. Toast the pumpkin seeds in a 350° oven for about 5 minutes or until fragrant. Remove and let cool.

  3. Toss all remaining salad ingredients together in the bowl with the kale.

  4. In a separate bowl, combine all dressing ingredients and whisk thoroughly. Alternately, you may place all ingredients in a small mason jar and shake vigorously.  

  5. Once all salad and dressing ingredients are prepared, pour desired amount of dressing onto the salad. Toss the salad and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before eating.

Recipe Notes

Gluten Free, Dairy Free, Vegan


stefanie gatesStefanie Gates, chef, is a regular blog contributor and culinary advisor for PreviMedica. She enjoys developing recipes and creating cooking videos to share with PreviMedica readers, as well as working one-on-one with clients to teach them valuable cooking skills. Her main recipe tester is her 2 year old son.

Recipe: Orange Ginger Mashed Butternut Squash

Orange Ginger Mashed Butternut Squash

 

This comforting recipe is a great change of pace for a healthy, yet flavorful side dish. The citrus adds brightness while warming ginger helps to soothe the digestive tract.

Orange Ginger Mashed Butternut Squash

Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 butternut squash (approximately 2-2½ pounds), peeled and cut into large chunks
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
  • 3/4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup coconut butter (manna) or coconut oil
  • Sea salt, to taste

Instructions

  1. Place butternut squash in a large pot. Cover with water and boil for 20 minutes or until tender. Drain thoroughly and set aside. 

  2. Combine the maple syrup, orange zest, orange juice, lemon juice, ginger, cinnamon, and coconut butter or oil in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a quick boil over high heat, being careful not to burn. Quickly lower to a simmer and cook about 2-3 minutes or until syrupy. Remove pan from heat. 

  3. Place drained butternut squash in a large bowl and pour orange mixture over the top. Mash together with a potato masher and season with salt. If a creamier texture is desired, transfer mixture to a food processor and pulse until smooth.

Recipe Notes

Cook’s notes: Substitute peeled sweet potatoes for butternut squash, if desired.

AIP adaptation: Reduce the amount of maple syrup to 2 tablespoons or omit completely.

Elimination/Provocation Diet adaptation: Omit orange zest, orange juice, and lemon juice.

Labels: Vegan, Paleo, AIP, EP, 30 minutes or less

Nutrients: A (beta), B6, C, E, Mn, Gl


Lisa MarkleyLisa Markley, MS, RDN is a dietitian, culinary nutrition expert, and co-author of The Essential Thyroid Cookbook: Over 100 Nourishing Recipes for Thriving with Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s. As a seasoned culinary educator and recipe developer, Lisa translates nutrition science to the plate using health-supportive ingredients prepared with peak flavor, seasonality, and nutrient density in mind. She shares her kitchen wisdom and food-as-medicine recipes to teach others how to harness the healing power of whole foods for vibrant health.

Recipes shared with permission from The Essential Thyroid Cookbook by Lisa Markley and Jill Grunewald, published by Blue Wheel PressTM. Recipes © 2017 by Lisa Markley, MS, RDN. Food photography © 2016 by Kenny Johnson.

Featured Student Member: Flannery Nielsen

 

Flannery Nielsen

Now introducing this month’s Featured Student Member, Flannery Nielsen, a Master’s student and 2018 Dietetic Internship candidate at Bastyr University. Flannery is pursuing her Master’s degree in Nutrition and Dietetics at Bastyr University in Seattle, WA. Her professional interests include women’s health, hormone balance, autoimmune disorders, community education and intuitive eating. She also loves yoga, cooking for friends and family and traveling.

Who or what inspired you to become interested in integrative and functional nutrition?​

I first became interested in integrative and functional nutrition about 5 years ago when I started working with a Naturopathic Doctor to resolve some personal health issues. She helped me discover multiple food allergies and intolerances and opened my eyes to a different way of approaching medicine. Changing the way I ate really revolutionized the way I felt both physically and emotionally. It was around the same time that I started practicing yoga which introduced me to the idea of the mind-body connection. This practice really resonated with me and complemented the new lifestyle I was creating for myself. What started as a personal health journey quickly became a desire to learn more and help others improve their health and learn to thrive in their own bodies, too. When I discovered the DIFM practice group after starting my Master’s degree, I knew right away that this was the type of practice and community that I had been seeking and that I wanted to be a part of.

What area of practice do you plan to go into and how do you plan to secure a job that utilizes integrative and functional nutrition?

There are so many areas that interest me right now that it’s hard for me visualize where exactly I will end up after my internship! I would like to eventually work in private practice, but I also love to do nutrition and culinary education. So I would like to do public health or community work, as well. It seems that securing a job that utilizes integrative and functional medicine is often about creating your own opportunities. Whether it is working in private practice, writing a blog or introducing integrative ideas in a more traditional setting I think it’s most important be willing to trail blaze a bit when necessary.

What education or training in integrative and functional nutrition have you completed or what education or training in integrative and functional nutrition do you plan to complete in the future?

I am very lucky because my program at Bastyr University incorporates integrative and functional nutrition into a lot of my courses. The past DIFM chair, Kelly Morrow, is one of my professors and she is such a wealth of knowledge when it comes integrative and functional therapies. I also attended the DIFM symposium at FNCE® this past October which was an amazing presentation and got me very excited to learn more about genetics and nutrition. I am looking forward to completing the Certificate of Training in Integrative and Functional Nutrition through the Academy Center for Lifelong Learning, as well. I haven’t started yet, but I would love to have that foundation before starting an internship (hopefully!) in the Fall.

Flannery Nielsen

What advice would you give other students interested in learning more about integrative and functional nutrition?

I would encourage them to find integrative and functional RDNs practicing in their area and ask if they can work or volunteer with them. I’ve worked for a local RDN here in Seattle for the past 2.5 years while I’ve been in school and it’s been a great way to get exposed to the both new research and the ideas and philosophies that make up the foundation of an integrative and functional nutrition practice.

Thank you so much for sharing your story with us, Flannery!


Ready to learn more about all that our student memberships have to offer? Check out our student member benefits here.

Featured Member: Robin Foroutan, MS, RDN, HHC

robin foroutan

We are elated about featuring Robin Foroutan, MS, RDN, HHC, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Spokesperson, as this month’s featured member!

What is your area of practice and how do you incorporate integrative and functional nutrition into your work?

I have a private practice, so I am fortunate enough to truly live and breath integrative and functional medicine. I work part time at The Morrison Center, a fantastic integrative medicine practice in New York City, and the rest of the week I see my own clients and write for Wholistic Matters, a site dedicated to providing nutritional research to health professionals.

What ​are some of the results you have seen since integrating functional nutrition​ into your practice area?​

I don’t think there was a time when I didn’t integrative functional nutrition into my practice, so that’s a difficult question to answer. I can’t imagine caring for my clients in any other way.

I don't think there was a time when I didn't integrate functional nutrition into my practice. Click To Tweet

Where have you completed most of your training in integrative and functional nutrition?

When I started studying the integrative medical model, there were very few cohesive programs that trained people in integrative and functional nutrition, so I started out simply attending conferences. Then, I completed the Institute for Integrative Nutrition health coaching program while preparing to go back to school to do my master’s degree and dietetic internship, but I yearned for something with more substance and there wasn’t much available at the time. Consequently, much of my training has been pieced together from attending conferences and training, learning from colleagues and mentors who I met through DIFM, reading and self-study, and attending conferences, lectures and watching webinars from various experts in the field. I’ve learned so much from generous integrative practitioners who took an interest in me and helped me hone my skills.

What advice would you give anyone interested in learning more about integrative and functional nutrition?

This is such an amazing time to receive quality training in integrative and functional nutrition! My first piece of advice would be to join DIFM and take advantage of all the learning opportunities they provide like webinars and pre-FNCE conferences, and if you can, get involved. My learning exploded when I joined the DIFM executive committee. I was able to meet my nutrition heroes and spend time working with the most brilliant integrative dietitians around, who I am fortunate enough to consider my close friends and colleagues. The education, encouragement and support I received from them was invaluable to my growth and career, and it opened all sorts of doors for me professionally as well. The Academy now offers the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Certificate of Training, which was a labor of love created by DIFM EC members. That is a great place to start. Second, take advantage of the free and low cost training that the high end supplement companies offer. Standard Process, Metagenics, Xymogen, Pure Encapsulations and others offer great webinars and one-day sessions that are great places to learn about different protocols and things of that nature. And third, find a cohesive program that takes you through all the different areas of integrative and functional nutrition. I’m a faculty member for Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy (IFNA), which was started by two fabulous DIFM executive committee members, Kathie Swift and Dr. Sheila Dean. That program is fantastic and is done remotely. There’s also Next Level Functional Nutrition courses that I’ve heard great things about, and other certificates offered by Rutgers University, University of Miami, Duke University, University of Kansas and Institute for Functional Medicine. There are also formal degree programs from University of Kansas, Maryland University of Integrative Health, and of course Bastyr University. Basically there are so many opportunities to learn more about integrative and functional nutrition, and it’s an ever evolving field, so there’s always so much more to learn.

Thank you for the inspiration, Robin!


Ready to take the plunge and get more involved with DIFM? Reach out to us here.

Recipe: Avocado Turmeric Smoothie

avocado turmeric smoothie

Add some healthy omega-6 fatty acids from avocado and anti-inflammatory benefits from turmeric to your breakfast with this quick green smoothie! Try freezing the avocado or pineapple in chunks for a cold refreshing drink.

avocado turmeric smoothie
5 from 2 votes
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Avocado Turmeric Smoothie


Servings 2

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1 small knob turmeric, peeled and grated
  • 1 thumb ginger, peeled and grated
  • 1/2 cup pineapple chunks

Instructions

  1. Blend coconut milk and together.

  2. Add remaining ingredients and blend until smooth. Enjoy!


Coral DabareraCoral Dabarera is pursuing her master’s degree in Nutrition, Healthspan, and Longevity at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. She is particularly interested in the gut microbiome and mental health and women’s health.  She is currently completing her clinical specialty rotation at a California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program affiliate (called Sweet Success) in Los Angeles. She enjoys yoga, hiking, travel, and trying new cuisines in her free time.

FNCE® 2017 Session Review: Clinical Insights into Vitamin B12

senior woman's hands vitamin B12

Clinical Insights into Vitamin B12

FNCE® 2017

Session Date: October 24, 2017

Session Presenter: Roman Pawlak, PhD, RD (East Carolina University)

Session Description: Once thought to be extremely rare and found only among some vegans, vitamin B12 deficiency is a worldwide problem. Hundreds of new publications describing new insights regarding the role of B12 status in disease development are published every year. Clinicians are not able to keep up with all of the new findings. This leads to holding on to old myths and assumptions and missing out on proper assessment of B12 status. Some key points included:

  1. Individuals at risk of inadequate B12 status include:
    • all vegetarians and vegans
    • older adults and elderly
    • those taking Metformin
    • those with gastrointestinal (GI) conditions/surgery
  2. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) set the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) at 2.4 mcg/d in 1998 based on the amount needed for the maintenance of hematological status and normal serum B12.
    • 9-month delay between hematological effects and signs of symptoms can be unfortunate for a growing fetus.
    • Intake of 4-7 mcg/d in individuals with normal absorption is associated with adequate B12 status, which suggests the current RDA of 2.4 mcg might be inadequate for optimal biomarker status even in a healthy population between 18 and 50 years of age.
    • Further research is needed to determine adequate amounts to compensate for daily B12 loss, which can range from 1.4 to 5.1 mcg/d.
    • New research calls for an increase in RDA and creation of age-based recommendations.
  3. Holotranscobalamin II (holoTCII or TCII) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) are the best assessment tools.
    • Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) is unreliable.
    • Serum B12 and homocysteine (Hcy) are used most often in clinical settings.
    • Studies have examined the relationship between plasma total Hcy and MMA to blood vitamin B12. Concentrations of these metabolic markers start to increase at B12 levels considerably above the typical cut-off value used to define B12-deficiency (148 pmol/L).
    • B12 concentrations in serum reflect both intake and stores. The lower limit varies with the method used and the laboratory conducting the analysis.
    • Hcy is a better marker than serum B12. Hcy has limitations; can be influenced by other non-nutritional and nutritional issues.
    • Use at least two different biomarkers to obtain reliable B12
  4. Hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin and platelet count can be indicative of B12.
    • Abnormally low Hb may be a result of B12 rather than iron deficiency.
    • B12 is needed for synthesis of all blood cells; affects will be seen in platelet values.
  5. B12 status and hyperhomocysteinemia are associated with select health conditions: cardiovascular disease (CVD), organic mental disorders, osteoporosis/bone fractures, brain atrophy, diabetic comorbidities.
    • Epidemiologic data linking Hcy with atherosclerosis is strong: each increase of 5 mmol/L in Hcy increases the risk of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) event by approximately 20%, independent of traditional CHD risk factors.
    • Vegetarians and vegans have higher levels of Hcy, and are at a higher risk for CVD, even when cholesterol and blood sugar are within normal levels.
    • In patients with brain atrophy and high baseline omega-3 fatty acids (>590 umol/L), B vitamin treatment slowed the mean atrophy rate by 40.0%. B vitamin treatment had no significant effect on the rate of atrophy among subjects with low baseline omega-3 fatty acids (<390 umol/L).
    • Meta-analysis of studies including 4,475 people showed a modest decrease in fracture risk of 4% per 50 pmol/L increase in B12.
    • “B12 is more effective than nortriptyline for the treatment of symptomatic painful diabetic neuropathy.”
  6. Reliable B12 deficiency treatment options include B12 injections and B12 supplements.
    • Nutritional yeast is effective only when fortified with B12, algal use is unreliable and probiotics made no difference.

Written by Samantha Abshire, a 2nd year MSN-DPD student at Bastyr University. She can be contacted at samantha.abshire7@gmail.com.


Hungry for more information? Check out our Archived Newsletters and Webinars in the members-only section of our website.

Recipe: Spinach, Artichoke, and Avocado Dip

Spinach, Artichoke, and Avocado Dip

 

This plant-based dip is super easy to make and can be used as a dip for fresh vegetables, organic corn chips, or stuffed into a lettuce wrap. Nutritional yeast provides a subtle cheesy flavor and a boost of B vitamins.

Spinach, Artichoke, and Avocado Dip
5 from 1 vote
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Spinach, Artichoke, and Avocado Dip

Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 large avocado
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 small clove garlic
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 2-3 tablespoons nutritional yeast (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 cup canned artichoke hearts, drained and chopped
  • 1 cup packed fresh spinach, finely chopped
  • Black pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Scoop the flesh from the avocado into a food processor affixed with an S-blade. Add basil, lemon juice, garlic, onion powder, nutritional yeast (if using), and salt. Process for 1-2 minutes, until completely smooth and creamy. Transfer avocado cream to a medium-sized bowl. Set aside.

  2. Place artichoke hearts and spinach into the bowl of the food processor and pulse a few times, being careful not to over-process. Don't worry about cleaning the avocado residue out of the bowl first.

  3. Transfer the artichoke and spinach mixture to the bowl with avocado cream and stir well to combine. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. 

  4. Place dip in a serving bowl and serve alongside fresh vegetables or corn chips.

Recipe Notes

Serving ideas: Any fresh vegetables are great for dipping, but try something new like thinly slicing jicama, golden beets, Chioggia beets, or watermelon radish, using endive leaves for scooping, or romaine and butter lettuces for wrapping.


Cook’s note:
This dip is best enjoyed right away, but may be kept for up to 1 day in the refrigerator before significant browning occurs. To minimize browning when stored, place in an airtight container with a layer of parchment paper pressed tightly against the dip to seal out air.

Labels: Gluten-free, Dairy-free, Vegan, Paleo, 30 minutes or less


Lisa MarkleyLisa Markley, MS, RDN is a dietitian, culinary nutrition expert, and co-author of The Essential Thyroid Cookbook: Over 100 Nourishing Recipes for Thriving with Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s. As a seasoned culinary educator and recipe developer, Lisa translates nutrition science to the plate using health-supportive ingredients prepared with peak flavor, seasonality, and nutrient density in mind. She shares her kitchen wisdom and food-as-medicine recipes to teach others how to harness the healing power of whole foods for vibrant health.

Recipes shared with permission from The Essential Thyroid Cookbook by Lisa Markley and Jill Grunewald, published by Blue Wheel PressTM. Recipes © 2017 by Lisa Markley, MS, RDN. Food photography © 2016 by Kenny Johnson.